• Author : The Strange Career of William Ellis The Texas Slave Who Became a Mexican Millionaire
  • Publisher : W. W. Norton & Company
  • Release Date : 2016-06-13
  • Pages : 352
  • ISBN : 9780393253863
  • Language : English, Spanish, and French

Book Summary:

Winner of the Ray Allen Billington Prize and the Phillis Wheatley Book Award "An American 'Odyssey,' the larger-than-life story of a man who travels far in the wake of war and gets by on his adaptability and gift for gab." —Wall Street Journal A black child born on the US-Mexico border in the twilight of slavery, William Ellis inhabited a world divided along ambiguous racial lines. Adopting the name Guillermo Eliseo, he passed as Mexican, transcending racial lines to become fabulously wealthy as a Wall Street banker, diplomat, and owner of scores of mines and haciendas south of the border. In The Strange Career of William Ellis, prize-winning historian Karl Jacoby weaves an astonishing tale of cunning and scandal, offering fresh insights on the history of the Reconstruction era, the US-Mexico border, and the abiding riddle of race in America.


  • Author : Reassembling the Strange
  • Publisher : Rowman & Littlefield
  • Release Date : 2018-10-15
  • Pages : 250
  • ISBN : 9781498576062
  • Language : English, Spanish, and French

Book Summary:

This book examines how Western naturalists and missionaries understood the environment of Madagascar during the nineteenth century.


  • Author : Black Land
  • Publisher : Princeton University Press
  • Release Date : 2019-09-10
  • Pages : 192
  • ISBN : 9780691194134
  • Language : English, Spanish, and French

Book Summary:

The first book to explore how African American writing and art engaged with visions of Ethiopia during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries As the only African nation, with the exception of Liberia, to remain independent during the colonization of the continent, Ethiopia has long held significance for and captivated the imaginations of African Americans. In Black Land, Nadia Nurhussein delves into nineteenth- and twentieth-century African American artistic and journalistic depictions of Ethiopia, illuminating the increasing tensions and ironies behind cultural celebrations of an African country asserting itself as an imperial power. Nurhussein navigates texts by Walt Whitman, Paul Laurence Dunbar, Pauline Hopkins, Harry Dean, Langston Hughes, Claude McKay, George Schuyler, and others, alongside images and performances that show the intersection of African America with Ethiopia during historic political shifts. From a description of a notorious 1920 Star Order of Ethiopia flag-burning demonstration in Chicago to a discussion of the Ethiopian emperor Haile Selassie as Time magazine’s Man of the Year for 1935, Nurhussein illuminates the growing complications that modern Ethiopia posed for American writers and activists. American media coverage of the African nation exposed a clear contrast between the Pan-African ideal and the modern reality of Ethiopia as an antidemocratic imperialist state: Did Ethiopia represent the black nation of the future, or one of an inert and static past? Revising current understandings of black transnationalism, Black Land presents a well-rounded exploration of an era when Ethiopia’s presence in African American culture was at its height.


  • Author : The Republic for Which It Stands
  • Publisher : Oxford University Press
  • Release Date : 2017-08-04
  • Pages : 912
  • ISBN : 9780190619060
  • Language : English, Spanish, and French

Book Summary:

The Oxford History of the United States is the most respected multivolume history of the American nation. In the newest volume in the series, The Republic for Which It Stands, acclaimed historian Richard White offers a fresh and integrated interpretation of Reconstruction and the Gilded Age as the seedbed of modern America. At the end of the Civil War the leaders and citizens of the victorious North envisioned the country's future as a free-labor republic, with a homogenous citizenry, both black and white. The South and West were to be reconstructed in the image of the North. Thirty years later Americans occupied an unimagined world. The unity that the Civil War supposedly secured had proved ephemeral. The country was larger, richer, and more extensive, but also more diverse. Life spans were shorter, and physical well-being had diminished, due to disease and hazardous working conditions. Independent producers had become wage earners. The country was Catholic and Jewish as well as Protestant, and increasingly urban and industrial. The "dangerous" classes of the very rich and poor expanded, and deep differences -- ethnic, racial, religious, economic, and political -- divided society. The corruption that gave the Gilded Age its name was pervasive. These challenges also brought vigorous efforts to secure economic, moral, and cultural reforms. Real change -- technological, cultural, and political -- proliferated from below more than emerging from political leadership. Americans, mining their own traditions and borrowing ideas, produced creative possibilities for overcoming the crises that threatened their country. In a work as dramatic and colorful as the era it covers, White narrates the conflicts and paradoxes of these decades of disorienting change and mounting unrest, out of which emerged a modern nation whose characteristics resonate with the present day.


  • Author : Classifying Christians
  • Publisher : Univ of California Press
  • Release Date : 2016-02-23
  • Pages : 320
  • ISBN : 9780520284265
  • Language : English, Spanish, and French

Book Summary:

"Classifying Christians investigates the ways in which late antique Christian heresiologists (150-450 C.E.) produced polemical ethnographies and presented their ethnographic dispositions in theological terms. The book demonstrates how the rituals, doctrines, customs, and origins of heretics functioned to map and delimit the composition of the Christian world and the world at large. Heresiology was about understanding human difference and organizing knowledge of it"--Provided by publisher.


  • Author : Annual Bibliography of English Language and Literature
  • Publisher :
  • Release Date : 2007
  • Pages :
  • ISBN : SRLF:AA0000173617
  • Language : English, Spanish, and French

Book Summary:

Includes both books and articles.


  • Author : The Strange Career of Bilingual Education in Texas 1836 1981
  • Publisher : Texas A & M University Press
  • Release Date : 2004
  • Pages : 204
  • ISBN : UOM:39015058247407
  • Language : English, Spanish, and French

Book Summary:

Covers the history of bilingual education in Texas from the 1830s until 1981.


  • Author : The Black male in America
  • Publisher : Burnham Inc Pub
  • Release Date : 1977
  • Pages : 375
  • ISBN : UOM:39015020730688
  • Language : English, Spanish, and French

Book Summary:

Essays describing and analyzing the social positions and role enactments of African-American males examine socialization, status, psychological and mythological myths, marriage, and family structure


  • Author : social structure and social personality
  • Publisher :
  • Release Date : 1974
  • Pages :
  • ISBN :
  • Language : English, Spanish, and French

Book Summary:


  • Author : Sons of Mississippi
  • Publisher : Vintage
  • Release Date : 2015-02-18
  • Pages : 368
  • ISBN : 9780804153348
  • Language : English, Spanish, and French

Book Summary:

They stand as unselfconscious as if the photograph were being taken at a church picnic and not during one of the pitched battles of the civil rights struggle. None of them knows that the image will appear in Life magazine or that it will become an icon of its era. The year is 1962, and these seven white Mississippi lawmen have gathered to stop James Meredith from integrating the University of Mississippi. One of them is swinging a billy club. More than thirty years later, award-winning journalist and author Paul Hendrickson sets out to discover who these men were, what happened to them after the photograph was taken, and how racist attitudes shaped the way they lived their lives. But his ultimate focus is on their children and grandchildren, and how the prejudice bequeathed by the fathers was transformed, or remained untouched, in the sons. Sons of Mississippi is a scalding yet redemptive work of social history, a book of eloquence and subtlely that tracks the movement of racism across three generations and bears witness to its ravages among both black and white Americans.